Wednesday, April 6, 2011

A 50-foot great white shark photographed off Ireland? An underwater bike tunnel? Other Call of the Wild headlines



A 50-foot great white shark photographed off Ireland? Uh, no
One needn’t bother clicking on Snopes.com to find out the legitimacy of a record 50-foot great white shark one lucky diver managed to photograph off Ireland. It’s rather obvious. Posted on April 1. His wife’s name is April (shown in the photo with the shark). Photographer’s name is Jester, as in motley fool. Still, you gotta love this quote from April in this SportDiver.com spoof: “I was scared for sure. If it had been hungry, I would have been a goner. And let’s face it, a shark doesn’t get to being that big without a healthy appetite.” Aside from a chuckle, what this photoshopped image gives us is what a 50-foot great white shark would look like if one did exist. Really, the photoshopping is beautifully done, no? Sport Diver


Vancouver considers underwater bike tunnel? Uh, no
The headline alone ought to give it away. But, yes, The Vancouver Courier -- a legitimate newspaper in Canada (at least we thought it was a legitimate newspaper in Canada) -- did run a story on April 1 about the city's plan to build the "Funnel" to connect downtown to southeast False Creek at a cost of $420 million. The Courier obtained the city's 52-page city report through the Freedom of Information legislation. An April Fools joke in an online diving magazine is one thing, but in a supposed real newspaper? No wonder newspapers are dying. Vancouver Courier

A 300-pound ray jumps into boat and lands on lady? Yes, true story
It happened aboard Two Chicks Charters while on a cruise off Islamorada, Florida. The 300-pound giant spotted eagle ray suddenly flew out of the water and landed on Jenny Hausch, who was pinned under the creature before crawling out from under it. This happened about the same time that a 375-pound mako shark jumped into a fishing boat off Texas. What's with these sea creatures lately, anyway? Luckily, Florida Wildlife Conservation officers witnessed the incident and assisted in returning the ray to the water. "This was not an attack," one officer told UPI. "These things are not looking to have a human meal." That's reassuring. UPI 

Ocean life can handle radioactive leaks? So say the experts
"Releases of radioactive water into the ocean near Japan's stricken nuclear complex shouldn't pose a widespread danger to sea animals or people who might eat them, experts say," the lede in the Kansas City Star article stated. And why is that? Because it's a very large ocean and because of dilution. Now, less than a mile or so from the nuclear plant is another story if this dumping continues for a long time, one expert said. Problems like genetic mutations (see above) can occur. Readings for radioactive iodine and cesium show a thousand-fold drop from the shore to monitors 19 miles offshore, the report states. Whew, that's a  relief. Pass the sushi. Kansas City Star

With possible end to Whale Wars, are Shark Wars next for Sea Shepherd? 
That's what it looks like. The Sea Shepherd Conservation Society, known for protecting whales against the Japanese whaling fleet in the Southern Ocean, will now focus on protecting sharks off Palau. Sea Shepherd signed an agreement with the Palau government to work with the Palauan Marine Law Enforcement Division to patrol the world's first shark sanctuary to prevent illegal fishing and shark-finning. Palau is an island 500 miles east of the Philippines and 2,000 miles south of Tokyo. You might recall, Paul Watson, founder of Sea Shepherd, recently stated that the Japanese earthquake and tsunami might have brought an end to Japanese whaling. So, will Animal Planet get a new series? Stay tuned. Radio Australia News


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Video: Kayaker unfazed by huge shark swimming toward him
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2 comments:

  1. thats closer to 35 ft. buy a tape measure

    ReplyDelete
  2. The underwater tunnel isn't a bad idea actually. If anything, bikers and skaters will be a lot safer than they were up on the roads. If ever it does become reality, I'm dropping by the local australian skate shop, heading over there, and see how well the skating is myself.

    ReplyDelete

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